Advice, From Within & From Outside

I’m not going to lie, the past 10 days have been rough. It’s probably because I overdid it a bit at Thanksgiving, but I was OUT OF COMMISSION, as in flat-on-my-back in bed, for a week.
We had the MOST amazing Thanksgiving in Wisconsin with Evan’s parents, so much good food and games, movies and fun!  We were snowed in for an extra day — and ENJOYED it — so that says a lot about our wonderful weekend!
 
The past few days I’ve been able to get up and go downstairs once or twice a day, but I paid for those excursions with incredibly nausea, headaches. Must have been the change in elevation (joke…)
 
At any rate, I’m more myself today, I actually made yogurt, and if all goes well I’ll try to make it to Gilda’s Club tomorrow.
 
It’s hard to swallow that this is still my reality 11 months after finishing my chemo. I definitely have ups and downs in my recovery, and when I overdo or force myself past my limitations, I end up paying for it afterward.
 
That’s the hardest thing to accept. I can’t push myself out of this, I have to just let recovery happen in it’s own time.
 
There’s an unhelpful voice in my head that tells me, “Other folks have ended their chemo and they’re back to their regular lives!” That same voice tells me that I’m being lazy, not really applying myself, not working hard enough to get better.
 
That voice is often joined by the voices of folks who would like to point me in a specific direction for my recovery. That’s been happening a lot this week in private emails (folks are worried because I’ve been on radio silence)

ADVICE ON GIVING [Medical] ADVICE
So, with that in mind, I’d like to offer my OWN advice for what is not terribly helpful when you’re speaking/writing to someone battling a serious disease*
 
• Please do not feel you need to comment with some new herb or mud-bath regime that a sick friend MUST do. Often those kind of “helpful” suggestions simply make one feel even worse, as though they, themselves, are definitely to blame for a slow recovery.
 
• If you know a person, and you’re friends in real life, and you’re speaking from personal experience, suggestions are easier to take.
 
• If you’re just passing along something you ‘heard’ from another friend or from the media, please keep it to yourself.
 
• Please don’t insist that your sick friend MUST try something because it’s GUARANTEED to work. Nothing is guaranteed.
 
• Please don’t try to guilt someone with an illness if they don’t do exactly what you feel they should do (a friend is now a former friend after a series of messages explaining that eating meat is DEFINITELY what caused my cancer…)
 
I cannot tell you how much I appreciate the love and concern that folks have shown me! Sometimes, though, the medical-friend advice can be a little hard to take when I’m at a low point in my recovery. Thank you for understanding!
 
*I’m in remission, my last scans have been good. But I still consider myself battling cancer as my exhaustion, back and hip pain, and numb legs are due to the Lymphoma and the chemo.